Seersucker – what you need to know

Seersucker – what you need to know

What is seersucker?

It’s a fabric, not a colour pattern, made by ‘puckering’ some of the threads using a slack-tension weave to create a wrinkled effect that keeps the cloth away from the skin, giving it cooling qualities.

Where does it come from?

The name comes from a Persian origin – sheer & shakar, which means ‘milk & sugar’ and has been popular with both high society and the working class, from British colonialists and Southern US gentlemen to train engineers, butchers and cotton workers. In 1920 ‘hipster’ undergraduates at Princeton took to wearing it, lending it a Great Gatsby air – a preppy image that remains to this day.

seersucker

Seersucker is hot!

In contrast to the famous cooling qualities of the cloth itself, the market for seersucker is decidedly hot at the moment. There was a noticeable upturn in demand last summer and this year a number of clothmakers have brought out their own seersucker ranges, aiming to capitalise on the popularity of this long standing summer standard.

Fit for purpose

Traditionally seersucker has been worn with a relaxed fit, especially in very warm climates. It also lends itself to a fitted look and ordering a made to measure or bespoke seersucker jacket will ensure the wearer looks sharp whilst remaining cool.

seersucker

Dark or colourful?

Dark colours are popular at the moment – black and navy in particular. For a more traditional, summery seersucker look, light blue or grey is often specified, and for the more adventurous a wide range of pinks, yellows, greens and reds are available. Ask Chris about them when you’re in the shop.

To book an appointment contact Chris here

I feel the need, the need for tweed

I feel the need, the need for tweed

Of late, Tweed has become rather cool – you see everyone from David Gandy to Guy Ritchie wearing it and hit TV shows like Peaky Blinders have lent it a roguish edge. Its commute from aristocratic country wear to the streets of Florence and Soho is well deserved. Tweed is a very interesting and adaptable cloth indeed.

Take Harris Tweed for example – you can only make it if you live on an island in the outer Hebrides and have a weaving shed attached to your croft. The result is a highly original and individual cloth – no two pieces are the same.

Harris is probably the most famous name in tweed but there are many other makers whose swatches display a surprisingly wide range of weaves and colours. There’s even a tweed for cyclists that has built in reflective qualities.

harris tweed

Tailors’ tweed swatches

Tweed lends itself to personalisation in other ways too – arm patches, patch pockets, velvet collars, chunky buttons. For a more conservative look, a black or dark blue tweed will serve you well in the chillier months.

Do you feel the need for tweed? Book an appointment with Chris here.

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Harris Tweed Jackets

Harris Tweed Jackets

The fashion police is largely a figure of speech, but there is one instance in which it has a literal meaning, and that is the strange case of the hand-made cloth from Scotland’s Outer Hebrides. This is because the use of the name Harris Tweed is restricted, by a 1993 act of Parliament, to fabric woven on the rain-lashed isles of Harris, Lewis, North and South Uist, Benbecula and Barra.

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Recreating Cary Grant’s North By Northwest Suit

Recreating Cary Grant’s North By Northwest Suit

Part 1- Finding the cloth

The blue/grey plaid suit Cary Grant wears in Alfred Hitchcock’s film North by Northwest was recently named the most iconic suit in cinema (by Esquire) – narrowly beating Sean Connery’s grey plaid three piece from Goldfinger. Both of course have Savile Row origins and both, like the best suits, have aged well. Esquire pays tribute to the ‘timeless design’ of Grant’s suit describing it ‘as fresh today as it was in 1959’. (more…)

The iGent in the grey flannel suit

Warm, fuzzy, soft, comfortable, rumpled, cosy and timeless. It’s no wonder that flannel is now highly sought after by the new generation of ‘iGents’, those men with a passionate interest in relatively clothes who’ve developed their taste and knowledge using blogs and forums, rather than the glossy men’s fashion magazines. (more…)

Visit Chris Kerr at our Soho shop.

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